Girls Education , What Is A Girl? – Read full story about girls

Girls Education , What Is A Girl? – Read full story about girls

girlsWhat Is A Girl?

She’s a bundle of sweetness
and brightness and fun
The beauty of springtime,
the warmth of the sun.

She’s Innocence covered with
mud, sand and soot
She’s Motherhood dragging
a doll by the foot.

She’s a composite picture
of giggles and tears
Of tantrums, excitement,
amusement and fears.
A bundle of mischief
and often a tease
A creature of moods
not too easy to please.

She can capture your heart
with her pixie-like grin
Or chatter and beg till
your patience wears thin.

But obedient, naughty,
mischievous or coy
She’s Mom’s little Darling
and Dad’s pride and joy.

A girl is a female human from birth through childhood and adolescence to attainment of adulthood when she becomes a woman. The term girl may also be used to mean a young woman, and is often used as a synonym for daughter. The treatment and status of girls in any society is usually closely related to the status of women in that culture.

 

Girls’ education

In Ancient Egypt, the princess Neferure grew up under the reign of her mother, the woman Pharaoh Hatshepsut, who had inherited the throne after the death of her husband Thutmose II. Women in Ancient Egypt had a relatively high status in society, and as the daughter of the pharaoh, Neferura was provided with the best education possible. Her tutors were the most trusted advisors of her mother. She grew up to take on an important role by taking on the duties of a queen while her mother was pharaoh. Despite the fact that women and men had a great deal of equality in Ancient Egypt, there were still important divisions in gender roles. Men worked as scribes for the government, for example, whereas women would often work at occupations tied to the home, such as farming, baking bread and brewing beer; however, a large number of women, particularly from the upper classes, worked in business and traded at markets, as perfumers, and some women also worked in temples. For this reason, girls’ and boys’ education differed. Boys could attend formal schools to learn how to read, write, and do math, while girls would be educated at home to learn the occupations of their mothers. Some women did become literate and were scholars, however, such as Hypatia.

 

Girls’ formal education has traditionally been considered far less important than that of boys. In Europe, exceptions were rare before the printing press and the Reformation made literacy more widespread. One notable exception to the general neglect of girls’ literacy is Queen Elizabeth I. In her case, as a child she was in a precarious position as a possible heir to the throne, and her life was in fact endangered by the political scheming of other powerful members of the court. Following the execution of her mother, Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth was considered illegitimate. Her education was for the most part ignored by Henry VIII. Remarkably, Henry VIII’s widow, Catherine Parr, took an interest in the high intelligence of Elizabeth, and supported the decision to provide her with an impressive education after Henry’s death, starting when Elizabeth was 9. Elizabeth received an education equal to that of a prominent male aristocrat; she was educated in Latin, Greek, Spanish, French, philosophy, history, mathematics and music. England reaped the reward of her rich education when circumstances resulted in her becoming a capable monarch.

By the 18th century, Europeans recognized the value of literacy, and schools were opened to educate the public in growing numbers. Education in the Age of Enlightenment in France led to up to a third of women becoming literate by the time of the French Revolution, contrasting with roughly half of men by that time. However, education was still not considered as important for girls as for boys, who were being trained for professions that remained closed to women, and girls were not admitted to secondary level schools in France until the late 19th century. Girls were not entitled to receive a Baccalaureate diploma in France until the reforms of 1924 under education minister Léon Bérard. Schools were segregated in France until the end of World War II. Since then, compulsory education laws have raised the education of girls and young women throughout Europe.

 

Hindi Kawita , Peom ka nayab sangam yahan pe padhe

If you want to purchase Assignments, Model papers and Project report please do contact us.
To know more about MBA AssignmentsModel papersProject reports, click on the links.

⇒  Please Contact us for further information / clarification

Dear readers, if you liked the post please do not forget to share with your friends at Facebook or other social media. Click on below button to share.

PLEASE ADD A COMMENT

PLEASE ADD A COMMENT

Assignments, Projects, Sample Papers
Minimum 4 characters
error: Content is protected !!
%d bloggers like this: