Chemical coordination and integration NEET questions with answer

Chemical coordination and integration play a vital role in maintaining the balance and functionality of living organisms. It involves the precise regulation and communication between different cells, tissues, and organs through the use of chemical messengers called hormones.

In this article, we present 50 multiple-choice questions (MCQs) related to chemical coordination and integration, along with their answers and detailed explanations.

These MCQs cover various aspects of this fascinating field, helping you deepen your understanding. Let’s explore the world of chemical coordination and integration!

Chemical coordination and integration NEET questions with answer

50 most important MCQs of Chemical coordination and integration for NEET

1. What is chemical coordination?
A. A process that involves the release of hormones into the bloodstream.
B. The transfer of chemical signals between cells.
C. The coordination of chemical reactions within the body.
D. The interaction between different chemical elements in the environment.

Answer: (B) Explanation: Chemical coordination refers to the transfer of chemical signals between cells, allowing them to communicate and regulate various physiological processes within the body.


2. Which of the following is not a component of the endocrine system?
A. Pancreas
B. Adrenal glands
C. Nervous system
D. Thyroid gland

Answer: (C) Explanation: The nervous system is not a component of the endocrine system. While both systems are involved in coordination and regulation, the endocrine system primarily relies on chemical messengers (hormones) transported through the bloodstream.


3. Which gland is considered the master gland of the endocrine system?
A. Thyroid gland
B. Pituitary gland
C. Adrenal gland
D. Pancreas

Answer: (B) Explanation: The pituitary gland, often referred to as the master gland, controls the release of hormones from other endocrine glands and plays a crucial role in regulating various bodily functions.


4. Which hormone is responsible for regulating blood glucose levels?
A. Insulin
B. Glucagon
C. Estrogen
D. Testosterone

Answer: (A) Explanation: Insulin, produced by the pancreas, regulates blood glucose levels by facilitating the uptake of glucose from the bloodstream into cells, thereby lowering blood sugar levels.


5. Which hormone is known as the “stress hormone”?
A. Cortisol
B. Oxytocin
C. Serotonin
D. Melatonin

Answer: (A) Explanation: Cortisol, produced by the adrenal glands, is often referred to as the stress hormone as it is released in response to stress and helps the body deal with various physiological and psychological challenges.


6. What is the function of growth hormone (GH)?
A. Regulating the sleep-wake cycle
B. Stimulating bone growth and cell reproduction
C. Controlling body temperature
D. Promoting digestion and nutrient absorption

Answer: (B) Explanation: Growth hormone (GH) plays a crucial role in stimulating bone growth, cell reproduction, and regeneration in the body. It is particularly important during childhood and adolescence.


7. Which hormone is responsible for the regulation of calcium levels in the body?
A. Thyroxine
B. Parathyroid hormone (PTH)
C. Calcitonin
D. Aldosterone

Answer: (B) Explanation: Parathyroid hormone (PTH), produced by the parathyroid glands, regulates calcium levels in the blood by stimulating the release of calcium from bones and increasing its reabsorption in the kidneys.


8. Which hormone is essential for the maintenance of water balance in the body?
A. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH)
B. Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)
C. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)
D. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)

Answer: (A) Explanation: Antidiuretic hormone (ADH), also known as vasopressin, helps regulate water balance by controlling the reabsorption of water in the kidneys, reducing urine production, and conserving body fluids.


9. What is the basic functional unit of the nervous system?
A. Gland
B. Hormone
C. Neuron
D. Cell

Answer: (C) Explanation: The basic functional unit of the nervous system is the neuron. Neurons are specialized cells responsible for transmitting electrical and chemical signals throughout the body, facilitating communication and coordination.


10. Which part of the brain is responsible for the coordination and fine motor control of voluntary movements?
A. Cerebellum
B. Medulla oblongata
C. Cerebrum
D. Hypothalamus

Answer: (A) Explanation: The cerebellum, located at the back of the brain, plays a crucial role in coordinating voluntary movements, maintaining balance, and ensuring precise motor control.


11. Which neurotransmitter is associated with pleasure and reward in the brain?
A. Dopamine
B. Serotonin
C. Acetylcholine
D. GABA (Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid)

Answer: (A) Explanation: Dopamine is a neurotransmitter closely associated with pleasure, reward, motivation, and reinforcement. It plays a role in various brain functions, including mood regulation and movement control.


12. Which part of the nervous system controls involuntary functions such as breathing and heart rate?
A. Autonomic nervous system
B. Central nervous system
C. Peripheral nervous system
D. Somatic nervous system

Answer: (A) Explanation: The autonomic nervous system regulates involuntary functions such as breathing, heart rate, digestion, and glandular secretion. It consists of two divisions: the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems.


13. Which structure connects the nervous system and the endocrine system?
A. Hypothalamus
B. Thalamus
C. Amygdala
D. Hippocampus

Answer: (A) Explanation: The hypothalamus, a small region located at the base of the brain, acts as a link between the nervous system and the endocrine system. It controls the release of hormones from the pituitary gland, integrating both systems.


14. Which hormone is responsible for the fight-or-flight response in stressful situations?
A. Epinephrine (adrenaline)
B. Cortisol
C. Thyroxine
D. Oxytocin

Answer: (A) Explanation: Epinephrine, also known as adrenaline, is released during the fight-or-flight response, preparing the body for intense physical activity and increasing alertness, heart rate, and blood flow to the muscles.


15. What is the function of oxytocin?
A. Regulating sleep and wake cycles
B. Stimulating milk production in breastfeeding women
C. Promoting feelings of love, trust, and bonding
D. Controlling blood pressure and heart rate

Answer: (C) Explanation: Oxytocin is often referred to as the “love hormone” due to its role in promoting feelings of love, trust, and bonding. It is involved in various social and reproductive behaviors.


16. Which condition is characterized by inadequate production of insulin or ineffective utilization of insulin, resulting in high blood glucose levels?
A. Diabetes mellitus
B. Hypothyroidism
C. Hyperthyroidism
D. Addison’s disease

Answer: (A) Explanation: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood glucose levels due to inadequate insulin production (Type 1 diabetes) or ineffective utilization of insulin (Type 2 diabetes).


17. Which gland is affected in Cushing’s syndrome?
A. Adrenal glands
B. Thyroid gland
C. Parathyroid glands
D. Pituitary gland

Answer: (A) Explanation: Cushing’s syndrome is caused by excessive levels of cortisol, often due to overactivity of the adrenal glands. It can lead to various symptoms, including weight gain, high blood pressure, and changes in the appearance of the face and body.


18. What is the condition characterized by an overactive thyroid gland, resulting in an increased metabolic rate?
A. Hyperthyroidism
B. Hypothyroidism
C. Goiter
D. Graves’ disease

Answer: (A) Explanation: Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland produces excessive amounts of thyroid hormones, leading to an increased metabolic rate, weight loss, rapid heartbeat, and other symptoms.


19. Which disorder is caused by an inadequate production of growth hormone during childhood, resulting in stunted growth?
A. Dwarfism
B. Gigantism
C. Acromegaly
D. Turner syndrome

Answer: (A) Explanation: Dwarfism is a condition characterized by inadequate production of growth hormone during childhood, leading to short stature and delayed growth and development.


20. What is the name of the condition that occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas?
A. Type 1 diabetes
B. Type 2 diabetes
C. Hypothyroidism
D. Hyperthyroidism

Answer: (A) Explanation: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, resulting in a deficiency of insulin production.


21. Why is chemical coordination and integration important in living organisms?
A. It helps maintain homeostasis.
B. It enables efficient communication between cells.
C. It ensures proper growth and development.
D. All of the above.

Answer: (D) Explanation: Chemical coordination and integration are vital for maintaining homeostasis (internal balance), enabling efficient communication between cells, and ensuring proper growth, development, and overall well-being.


22. How do chemical signals travel within the body for coordination and integration?
A. Through the bloodstream
B. Via direct cell-to-cell contact
C. Through the lymphatic system
D. By electrical impulses

Answer: (A) Explanation: Chemical signals involved in coordination and integration travel through the bloodstream. Hormones, the chemical messengers, are released into the bloodstream by endocrine glands and carried to target cells and organs.


23. What are the main differences between the nervous system and the endocrine system in terms of communication and speed of response?
A. The nervous system uses electrical impulses for communication, while the endocrine system relies on chemical signals.
B. The nervous system has a faster response time compared to the endocrine system.
C. The endocrine system’s effects are long-lasting compared to the nervous system.
D. All of the above.

Answer: (D) Explanation: The nervous system uses electrical impulses for rapid communication, resulting in faster responses. In contrast, the endocrine system relies on chemical signals (hormones) that travel through the bloodstream, resulting in a slower but longer-lasting response.


24. How can imbalances or disorders in chemical coordination be treated?
A. Through medication or hormone replacement therapy
B. Dietary and lifestyle changes
C. Surgical interventions
D. All of the above, depending on the specific condition

Answer: (D) Explanation: The treatment of imbalances or disorders in chemical coordination depends on the specific condition but may involve medication, hormone replacement therapy, dietary and lifestyle changes, and, in some cases, surgical interventions.


25. Hormones are chemical messengers that:
A. Regulate body temperature
B. Maintain fluid balance
C. Coordinate and control various body functions
D. Aid in digestion

Answer: (C) Explanation: Hormones serve as chemical messengers that coordinate and control various body functions, including growth, metabolism, reproduction, and response to stress.


26. The master gland of the endocrine system is the:
A. Thyroid gland
B. Pituitary gland
C. Adrenal gland
D. Pancreas

Answer: (B) Explanation: The pituitary gland, located at the base of the brain, is often referred to as the master gland because it controls the release of hormones from other endocrine glands.


27. Insulin is produced by which organ of the body?
A. Liver
B. Pancreas
C. Kidneys
D. Spleen

Answer: (B) Explanation: Insulin, a hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar levels, is produced by the pancreas, specifically by beta cells located in the islets of Langerhans.


28. The hormone responsible for the regulation of calcium levels in the blood is:
A. Insulin
B. Parathyroid hormone (PTH)
C. Calcitonin
D. Aldosterone

Answer: (B) Explanation: Parathyroid hormone (PTH), produced by the parathyroid glands, regulates calcium levels in the blood by stimulating the release of calcium from bones and increasing its reabsorption in the kidneys.


29. Which neurotransmitter is associated with feelings of happiness and pleasure?
A. Dopamine
B. Serotonin
C. Acetylcholine
D. GABA

Answer: (A) Explanation: Dopamine is a neurotransmitter associated with feelings of happiness, pleasure, and reward. It plays a role in motivation, addiction, and movement control.


30. The autonomic nervous system is responsible for:
A. Voluntary movements
B. Reflex actions
C. Digestion and heart rate regulation
D. Conscious thought processes

Answer: (C) Explanation: The autonomic nervous system regulates involuntary processes such as digestion, heart rate, breathing, and glandular activity, ensuring the body’s internal balance.


31. The gap between two neurons where signals are transmitted is called:
A. Synapse
B. Axon
C. Dendrite
D. Myelin sheath

Answer: (A) Explanation: The synapse is the junction between two neurons, where electrical signals are converted into chemical signals for transmission to the next neuron. This allows communication between neurons.


32. Which gland is responsible for the production of melatonin, a hormone that regulates sleep-wake cycles?
A. Pineal gland
B. Adrenal gland
C. Thymus gland
D. Thyroid gland

Answer: (A) Explanation: The pineal gland, located in the brain, produces melatonin, a hormone that helps regulate sleep-wake cycles and plays a role in the body’s circadian rhythm.


33. Which hormone is responsible for the development and maintenance of male secondary sexual characteristics?
A. Estrogen
B. Progesterone
C. Testosterone
D. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)

Answer: (C) Explanation: Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone responsible for the development and maintenance of male secondary sexual characteristics, such as facial hair, deep voice, and muscle mass.


34. The adrenal glands are located on top of which organ?
A. Kidneys
B. Liver
C. Pancreas
D. Spleen

Answer: (A) Explanation: The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys. They consist of two parts: the outer adrenal cortex, which produces steroid hormones, and the inner adrenal medulla, which secretes adrenaline and noradrenaline.


35. Which hormone is responsible for the “fight or flight” response during stressful situations?
A. Oxytocin
B. Adrenaline
C. Insulin
D. Thyroxine

Answer: (B) Explanation: Adrenaline, also known as epinephrine, is released by the adrenal glands in response to stress or danger. It prepares the body for immediate physical activity and increases alertness, heart rate, and blood flow to the muscles.


36. Hypothyroidism is characterized by:
A. Overproduction of thyroid hormones
B. Underproduction of thyroid hormones
C. Overproduction of insulin
D. Underproduction of insulin

Answer: (B) Explanation: Hypothyroidism refers to an underactive thyroid gland, resulting in insufficient production of thyroid hormones. It can lead to symptoms such as fatigue, weight gain, and depression.


37. Which condition is caused by the insufficient production of insulin or the body’s inability to effectively use insulin?
A. Type 1 diabetes
B. Type 2 diabetes
C. Hypoglycemia
D. Hyperthyroidism

Answer: (A) Explanation: Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the destruction of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, leading to a lack of insulin production. It requires lifelong insulin replacement therapy.


38. Which hormone imbalance is associated with the development of goiter?
A. Insulin imbalance
B. Thyroid hormone imbalance
C. Adrenaline imbalance
D. Estrogen imbalance

Answer: (B) Explanation: Goiter, an enlargement of the thyroid gland, is often caused by an imbalance in thyroid hormones. It can be associated with iodine deficiency or certain autoimmune disorders.


39. What is the main cause of Cushing’s syndrome?
A. Overproduction of growth hormone
B. Overproduction of cortisol
C. Underproduction of thyroid hormones
D. Underproduction of insulin

Answer: (B) Explanation: Cushing’s syndrome is caused by the overproduction of cortisol, often due to excessive use of corticosteroid medications or a tumor in the adrenal glands.


40. Which condition is characterized by excessive thirst, increased urination, and high blood sugar levels?
A. Hypothyroidism
B. Hyperthyroidism
C. Diabetes mellitus
D. Addison’s disease

Answer: (C) Explanation: Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder characterized by high blood sugar levels. Common symptoms include excessive thirst (polydipsia), increased urination (polyuria), and unexplained weight loss.


41. Which system is responsible for the integration and coordination of body functions through electrical impulses?
A. Endocrine system
B. Nervous system
C. Respiratory system
D. Digestive system

Answer: (B) Explanation: The nervous system is responsible for the integration and coordination of body functions through the transmission of electrical impulses along neurons.


42. How do chemical signals involved in coordination and integration travel throughout the body?
A. Through the bloodstream
B. By diffusion through tissues
C. Through the lymphatic system
D. By electrical impulses

Answer: (A) Explanation: Chemical signals involved in coordination and integration travel through the bloodstream. Hormones, the chemical messengers, are released into the bloodstream by endocrine glands and carried to target cells and organs.


43. How does the hypothalamus contribute to the coordination and integration of the body’s systems?
A. It produces hormones that directly regulate body functions.
B. It controls the release of hormones from the pituitary gland.
C. It coordinates voluntary movements and fine motor control.
D. It regulates the body’s response to stress.

Answer: (B) Explanation: The hypothalamus, a region in the brain, controls the release of hormones from the pituitary gland, thereby influencing the function of other endocrine glands and coordinating hormonal regulation.


44. What is the role of negative feedback in maintaining homeostasis in chemical coordination and integration?
A. It amplifies the response to a stimulus, ensuring a rapid physiological adjustment.
B. It maintains a stable internal environment by counteracting changes and restoring balance.
C. It coordinates voluntary movements and motor control.
D. It regulates the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythm.

Answer: (B) Explanation: Negative feedback mechanisms in chemical coordination and integration help maintain a stable internal environment by counteracting changes and restoring balance. They ensure that hormone levels remain within a narrow range, avoiding excessive fluctuations.


45. Which of the following is a chemical messenger in the nervous system?
A. Hormones
B. Neurotransmitters
C. Enzymes
D. Antibodies

Answer: (B) Explanation: Neurotransmitters are chemical messengers in the nervous system that transmit signals between neurons, allowing for communication and coordination.


46. What is the function of insulin in the body?
A. To increase blood sugar levels
B. To decrease blood sugar levels
C. To stimulate the release of adrenaline
D. To regulate body temperature

Answer: (B) Explanation: Insulin functions to decrease blood sugar levels by facilitating the uptake of glucose by cells, promoting its storage as glycogen in the liver and muscles.


47. Which of the following hormones is produced by the adrenal glands?
A. Insulin
B. Estrogen
C. Cortisol
D. Thyroxine

Answer: (C) Explanation: The adrenal glands produce cortisol, a hormone involved in the body’s stress response and regulation of metabolism.


48. Which gland is responsible for the production of insulin?
A. Pancreas
B. Thyroid gland
C. Pineal gland
D. Adrenal gland

Answer: (A) Explanation: The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar levels and facilitates the uptake of glucose by cells.


49. The function of the thyroid gland is primarily regulated by:
A. Parathyroid hormone
B. Thyroxine
C. Insulin
D. Growth hormone

Answer: (B) Explanation: The function of the thyroid gland is primarily regulated by thyroxine, a hormone produced by the thyroid gland itself.


50. Which hormone is responsible for calcium regulation in the body?
A. Parathyroid hormone
B. Growth hormone
C. Oxytocin
D. Estrogen

Answer: (A) Explanation: Parathyroid hormone is responsible for calcium regulation in the body, maintaining proper levels of calcium in the blood and bones.


Special MCQs of Biodiversity and conservation for NEET aspirants

Conclusion

Chemical coordination and integration are essential processes that ensure the proper functioning and harmony of the human body. Through this article, we have explored 50 MCQs related to this fascinating field, covering various aspects of hormonal regulation, nervous system integration, disorders, and the significance of chemical coordination.

Understanding these concepts will deepen your knowledge and provide a solid foundation for further exploration in the field of biology and medicine.

Remember, chemical coordination and integration are complex topics, and this article only scratches the surface. If you want to delve deeper and expand your understanding, continue exploring reputable scientific sources and consult experts in the field.

Share on Social Media

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *